Fougasse (Provençal Bread with Olives & Herbs)

The look of this bread was interesting to me, plus the herbs looked wonderful.  Reading about Fougasse, I found out it is a type of bread typically associated with Provence but found (with variations) in other regions.  Some versions are sculpted or slashed into a pattern resembling an ear of wheat or a leaf.  It is a simple and versatile flat bread…pronounced “foogass“.  You can add different herbs, olives, and cheese to create your own taste.  Pull apart and enjoy.

                        

This recipe from thehungrymouse.com

1¹⁄3 cups warm water (about 110°)
1 tsp dry yeast
1 tsp sugar
2 Tbl olive oil
4 cups flour
1 tsp salt
1/4 cup kalamata olives, minced
1/4 cup green olives, minced
2 Tbl parsley, minced
2 Tbl thyme, minced
1 Tbl rosemary, minced
Sea salt
freshly cracked black pepper

In a large bowl of mixer, add warm water and sprinkle yeast and sugar; let sit until foamy, 10 minutes.  Stir in oil, flour, and salt and mix until a dough forms.  Knead.  Cover with damp towel, let sit until doubled in size about 1½ hours.

Divide dough into 5 equal pieces.  Working with one piece at a time, roll into a rough 8″ x 5″ triangle.  Transfer rectangle to a cornmeal-dusted Silpat or parchment lined baking sheet.  Cut slashes in middle of dough to make desired design (traditionally was made to look like wheat stalk or leaf).  Spread slashes apart a bit with your fingers.  Cover with a damp towel, let rest until puffed, about 30 minutes.

Heat oven to 450°.  Combine olives and herbs in bowl.  Lightly brush each dough piece with olive oil, sprinkle with olive mixture, and season with salt & pepper.  Bake, until golden brown, watch closely 8-15 minutes, time depends on thickness.

One Year Ago Today:  Lemon Crumb Muffins with Lemon Glaze

If you are interested in Demarle bakeware and kitchen tools such as the Roul’Pat & Beechwood Rolling Pin or Silpat & Perforated Baking Sheet please visit mydemarleathome.com/kristenparker or simply click on the Demarle at Home logo below.

 

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